PET/CT SERVICES

What is a PET/CT scan?

A PET/CT scan combines positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) images. PET images show how organs and tissues in the body are working. CT images show details of body anatomy such as vessels, lymph nodes and organs. When PET and CT scans are combined, the fused images help doctors detect cancer, heart problems, neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s, and other central nervous system disorders.

Exceptionally Qualified Radiologists

Our board-certified and fellowship-trained Radiologists, Dr. Jason Cheng and Dr. Jacob Wouden, are among the most respected in their field. We make sure your doctor has the results of your scan within 24 hours, and our Radiologists are available to your doctor to answer any questions or schedule post-scan consultations to discuss the results.

Jason Cheng, M.D

Jason Cheng, M.D.

Jason Cheng, M.D. is the Director of Medical Imaging at Washington Hospital. He received his medical degree from Stanford University School of Medicine, where he also completed his residency in Diagnostic Radiology.

Jacob R. Wouden, M.D

Jacob R. Wouden, M.D.

Jacob R. Wouden received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School. He remained at Harvard for his residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and completed his fellowship in Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

How to Prepare for Your PET/CT Appointment:

The Day Before Your Scan:

  • Eat a low carbohydrate/high protein diet (have meat, eggs, cheese-avoid cereals, bread, sugar, etc.)

  • It’s important to be well-hydrated. We recommend you drink 4 glasses of plain clear unflavored water.

  • No strenuous exercise (running, weight lifting, biking, etc.)

The Day of Your Scan:

Specific instructions will be provided based on which tracer will be used and whether you are diabetic, but general instructions are as follows:
  • Nothing to eat 4 hours prior to your scan – (no mints, gum, cough drops and hard candy).
  • Prior to the fasting period, eat a high protein, low carbohydrate diet.
  • Your glucose level will be tested once you arrive at the scanning facility. If for any reason your level is out the range approved by the radiologist, your exam will have to be rescheduled.
  • Drink 2-3 cups of plain, clear, unflavored water only throughout the fasting period (no juice, coffee, tea or soda).
  • Take your oral medication or insulin 4 hours prior to your exam. Do not take any of your diabetic meds within 4 hours from the start of your appointment.
  • If you use an insulin pump, please contact our scheduling department for further instructions.
  • Bring as few items as possible however; please DO bring a current list of medications and your insurance card.
  • Wear warm, comfortable metal free clothing.
  • Post scan instructions will be provided by the Technologist
Specific instructions will be provided based on which tracer will be used and whether you are diabetic, but general instructions are as follows:
  • Nothing to eat 6 hours prior to your scan – (no mints, gum, cough drops and hard candy).
  • Drink 2-3 cups of plain, clear, unflavored water only throughout the fasting period (no juice, coffee, tea or soda).
  • Take medication as scheduled as long as they can be tolerated on an empty stomach.
  • Bring as few items as possible however; please DO bring a current list of medications and your insurance card.
  • Wear warm, comfortable metal free clothing.
  • Post scan instructions will be provided by the Technologist

What to Expect During Your PET/CT Exam

In preparation for a PET/CT exam, you will receive a small injection of radioactive tracer. You will then rest comfortably while the radioactive tracer moves through your body for approximately 60 minutes. Then we take you to the scanner for your exam, which lasts anywhere from 20-45 minutes, depending upon the body area being scanned.

After your scan, be sure to drink plenty of water to help safely flush the radioactive tracer from your body. PET/CT scans are considered low risk and normal activity can be resumed right away, however, if you are breast feeding or will be around young children, please speak with the technologists about precautions to take.

* Depending on your circumstances and when compared to hospital-based medical imaging rates.